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Gracefully-Yours presents Life Lessons and Leadership Tips from St. Patrick

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Gracefully-Yours, America's favorite encouragement and mentoring cards presents Life Lessons from St. Patrick.

borrowing from Lee Cockerell’s blog...

Born to a wealthy British-Roman family, Patrick was kidnapped by a band of Irish marauders as a teenager. The raiders carried him off to Ireland where they pressed him into servitude, tending their flocks and fields. Isolated and alone, Patrick clung to his faith to endure the cruelty of his masters.

After six years in captivity, Patrick summoned the courage to risk escape. He ran away from his captors, surviving a 200-mile trek across Ireland to the sea. Upon arrival to the coast, he talked his way onto a shipping vessel bound for his homeland.

Lesson #1 – Don’t harbor grudges After being enslaved in Ireland, you would think Patrick would have been embittered at the Irish for stealing six years of his life. However, he dedicated the next 15 years to studying theology in preparation for a return trip to Ireland as a missionary. Choose forgiveness.

Lesson #2 – Go the extra mile to make amends

Patrick was not exactly a welcome visitor back in Ireland–especially when he began teaching a religion that ran contrary to the beliefs held by druid priests. However, Patrick won favor by returning to his former master and paying the full ransom price of a slave as “compensation” for his escape. Be generous.

Lesson #3 – When reconciling a relationship, speak the other person’s language

During his six years of forced labor in Ireland, Patrick gained a working knowledge of the Celtic language. When he returned as a priest, he could speak directly to the Irish in their native tongue. Furthermore, Patrick understood the religious sensibilities of druidism from his time in captivity. 

 

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