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Charlie Glickman, PhD Chats about Sex-Positivity

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"I offer classes and consultations on adult education and its application to any topic. My seminars model the processes of effective teaching and can help anyone integrate the principles and practices of adult education into their teaching style. I especially enjoy teaching sex educators how to create, teach, and evaluate amazing workshops that help spread sexual health and information." ~ Charlie Glickman, PhD

Sex, Shame, and Love

Shame influences and shapes sexuality for almost everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and individual desires. If we want to overcome and move past sexual shame, we need to understand how it works and how it affects us. We’ll unpack the mechanisms of shame, discuss how it shapes sexuality, and what we can do to build shame resilience. When we have the tools to deal with this difficult but inevitable emotion, it becomes much easier to resolve jealousy, loss, and fear so we can create more space to give and receive love, explore our authentic selves, and build the relationships that suit us. Come learn new ways to keep shame from getting in the way and create the relationships that work for you.

Sex-Positivity

The legacy of sex-negativity, the myth of the normal, and institutionalized sexual shame have left deep marks upon society. Although sexual images and messages surround us, they are often indicative of obsession rather than sexual health. Moving towards a sex-positive perspective can help us find the balance between repression and rebellion in order to discover our individual sexual well-being. This topic can be approached from a number of perspectives, including sexual health, communication, sexual authenticity, gender diversity, and social oppression.

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