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Accountability Citizenship

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Stephen P. Tryon “holds a B.S. from West Point and an M.A. in philosophy from Stanford University.  He served as a soldier in the United States army for 21 years.  At the end of his army career, he served as a legislative fellow for Senator Max Cleland, as well as a legislative assistant to the senior general at army headquarters in the Pentagon.

More recently, Tryon has worked as a Senior VP of Human Resources and International Business at Overstock.com.  He has spent four years managing logistics and five years managing human resources and international business.  Stephen P. Tryon is the author of Accountability Citizenship.

According to the book description of Accountability Citizenship, it “explains how we can restore accountability in government by accepting our personal accountability for some simple tasks we must do as individual citizens living in the age of information. The book is non-partisan. Readers are asked only to agree on the very basics—that the government of the United States is supposed to represent the people of the United States.

The author makes a compelling case that changes in our information distribution technologies and business models discourage effective political participation by citizens. In the early days of our republic, information distribution was based on newspapers—subscription-based and geographically aligned with the representative structure of Congress. Over the past forty years, deregulation of television and radio along with the information technology revolution have disrupted this alignment. But we can restore accountability through the three steps of accountability citizenship: being appropriately positive, appropriately informed and appropriately engaged.”

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