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BAGHDAD ER: Fifteen Minutes

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The June 28, 2012, episode of American Heroes Radio features a conversation withMajor Todd Baker, USA (ret.) who served as chief of the Emergency Medical Treatment (EMT) Section of the 86th Combat Support Hospital; and, is the author of Baghdad ER: Fifteen Minutes.

Major Todd Baker, USA (ret.) “is a board certified emergency physician who served as chief of the Emergency Medical Treatment (EMT) Section of the 86th Combat Support Hospital. In 2006 he joined the medical staff of Madigan Army Medical Center where he served as an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine for the University of Washington. During his fifteen-month tour, Dr. Baker served as the Emergency Medicine Consultant to the Army Surgeon General for the Iraq theater. He has been published in multiple medical journals during his seven plus years serving in the Army including Annals of Emergency Medicine and EM Clinics of North America. His academic interests focus on emergency ultrasound techniques and trauma resuscitation and he was instrumental in updating the medical ultrasound systems used in combat support hospitals throughout Iraq. His military decorations include the Bronze Star, Army Commendation Medal, Combat Action Badge, and the Meritorious Service Medal among others.”  Major Todd Baker is the author of Baghdad ER: Fifteen Minutes.

According to the book description of Baghdad ER: Fifteen Minutes, “The first hour after a major trauma is known as the Golden Hour. During those sixty minutes, every step in a patient's resuscitation can mean the difference between life and death. In Baghdad, American military personnel would bleed to death within minutes. We did not have the Golden Hour. We had fifteen minutes. This is our story.”

Tags:
BAGHDAD ER
todd baker
86th Combat Support Hospital
Emergency Medicine
trauma resuscitation
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