Kevin Talks to Garry Mckinnon's Mother Janis Sharp (Exclusive) also Joining me Ivan Corea of UKAF

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Kevin Healey

Kevin Healey

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On Todays show Janice Sharp joins me the Mother of Garry Mckinnon, and Ivan Corea a leading Autism Champion of UKAF the Autism foundation Gary McKinnon, could face extradition from Britain to the United States where he would stand trial for hacking into US government computers and could face a sentence of sixty years (Charged with 7 counts, proposed sentence Ten Years Per Count) Gary has recently been diagnosed as suffering from Lifetime Aspergers Syndrome, which is why his family, friends and supporters around the world are arguing that Gary should be allowed to stay in the U.K and face the courts in the country where the offence, if offence there was, was committed. Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, a world renowned expert on Aspergers and Autism feels strongly that Gary should absolutely not be extradited to the U.S. Professor Tony Atwood another world renowned expert on Aspergers and Autism also feels strongly that Gary should absolutely not be extradited to the U.S. As does Luke Beardon, a lecturer in Autism/Aspergers at Sheffield University and an expert on Aspergers and the law. The United States authorities waited two years to call for Gary's arrest because of a then unratified, unsigned extradition treaty between the two countries which would make it easier for them to have a British citizen sent for trial in the US. Yet, when he was first arrested in London, Gary was told he would probably get a sentence of community service for his hacking activities. He naively admitted computer misuse before he had engaged a lawyer and without a lawyer even being present. We were still unaware that he had Aspergers Syndrome. Gary gained no leniency for his honesty and on the contrary, his extradition has been relentlessly pursued by the British and American authorities, despite the crown prosecution service (CPS) declining to prosecute Gary in Britain.

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