Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

The Kerri Edelman Show presents Post Grunge Band Oleander

  • Broadcast in Rock Music
  • 0 comments
Kerri Edelman

Kerri Edelman

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow Kerri Edelman.

Call in to speak with the host

(805) 243-1320

h:157475
s:5267573
archived

Oleander came to prominence in the late 1990s and early '00s, releasing February Son (1999) and Unwind (2001) before moving over to Sanctuary for Joyride (2003). Hailing from Sacramento, the band built up a healthy following of fans and garnered radio support, thanks to their melodic, post-grunge sound. But the music extended beyond hybrids and music critic jargon and terminology. It had a pulse and a heartbeat, with blood surging through its riffy veins. But despite the success, the grind of touring and promotion took its toll, as it often inevitably does, and the band felt drained. Things weren't fun anymore around 2003 and the boys decided it was time to take a step back, something they were well within their rights to do. That's a refreshing and honest attitude to have, and it's also indicative of the organic nature of the album, all factors that should help Something Beautiful find its audience. And judging from the songs that comprise Something Beautiful, Oleander may get what they weren't looking for. The result is an album that bridges the gap between modern and alternative rock, with Eldridge going so far as to say that the band can't and won't pinpoint influences. "Since our second record and the writing of our third to this point, being our fourth release, I think we have come into our own. If there are influences there, I can't tell you what they are. We get together and write from our hearts," he said. Oleander bassist Doug Eldridge offered a simple but profound statement about his band's new album Something Beautiful, their first effort since embarking on a self-imposed hiatus (but not a break up) that began somewhere around 2005. "We did this for ourselves and to have fun, since we love it," Eldridge said. "If this [record] is huge, great. If not, we had fun and we loved doing it. What happens now is out of our hands." For more information, visit www.oleander.net

Comments

 comments