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Living Master Artist Virgil Elliott on Art from the Renaissance to the Present

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Independent Artists and Thinkers

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What does it take to make art now at the level of Renaissance Art? Why is it important to do so? Join us as artist Virgil Elliott talks about painting, drawing, music, technique, and teaching.

Painter/writer Virgil Elliott (born 1944) is best known as the author of the book, Traditional Oil Painting: advanced techniques and concepts from the Renaissance to the present, published in 2007 by Watson-Guptill Publications. Acknowledged as a Living Master by the Art Renewal Center, among the many honors and awards he has received over the years, Virgil is widely recognized as an expert on historic oil painting techniques and oil painting materials of the past and present.  He has written and published articles on the working methods and/or lives of Rembrandt, Titian, Frans Hals, Artemisia Gentileschi, and the 19th Century French artist William Bouguereau, among other things. He taught oil painting at the College of Marin, in Marin County, California for a few years, and has taught privately since 1982. 

He has been an active participant/member of ASTM International’s Subcommittee on Artists’ Paints and Materials since 1997, which experience has broadened his knowledge of artists’ materials considerably and has made him the acquaintance of many experts in the field, including top-level conservation scientists from major museums, from whom he says he has learned a great deal over the years.

Virgil Elliott keeps a studio in California’s Wine Country, where he paints, teaches and writes, and lives with his wife, singer/actress Annie Lore.  From time to time he has “moonlighted” as a musician, playing guitar and Renaissance lute, both as a solo instrumentalist and occasionally as accompanist to various vocalists. He feels that music and visual art complement one another. 

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