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“Medical Ethics and the “Concept of a Good Death” Part Two

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Part Two -"Medical Ethics and the Concept of a Good Death.' features Kenneth W. Goodman, Ph.D., co-director of the University of Miami’s Ethics Programs, founder and director of the Bioethics Program and its Pan American Bioethics Initiative and director of the Ethics Programs' World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Ethics and Global Health Policy. My second guest, Kadam Nick Gillespie is the Resident Teacher of Drolma Kadampa Buddhist Center in Fort Lauderdale. He is a senior meditation teacher in the New Kadampa Tradition and has been studying and practicing Buddhist meditation for over 25 years under the guidance of his Spiritual Guide, Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. The topic of religion and medical ethics has sparked such interest, that in order to afford each guest ample time for discussion, I will host faith-based concerns and medical ethics experts individually. I chose to start with Buddhism to be covered in the final segment of Part Two. Sample questions: Describe the field of study in Medical Ethics and the events that have shaped it. Do we have a ‘right’ to die? ( in context of negative right (others may not interfere) and positive right (others must help)) Do we own our own bodies and our lives? If we do own our own bodies, does that give us the right to do whatever we want with them? Discuss the Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act. Does this protect the right to “a good death”? Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, are they needed and if so, are they based in fears of a poor death and suffering? In the Terri Schiavo case, and the Karen Ann Quinlan case, state and federal government got involved with an individual and family private concerns. Can you describe for us the cases and what were the conflicts? Should a dying person be told they are dying to facilitate spiritual teachings? What are the concerns of withholding life support and removing life support? What is the position taken from religious teachings? Kada

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