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Reviewing The Works and Life of Brother George Subira

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We will close the year out reviewing 3 books written by my Brother and Comrade in struggle George Subira. December 10 through December 14 : Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America December 17 through December 21 : Black Folks Guide to Business Success December 24 through December 28 Getting Black Folks To Sell. Brother George passed and became an ancestor in December 2010 one week after doing a 2 hour broadcast right here on Home Base Business 101. So we want to honor him by sharing his wisdom. 

FOR A MAN who spent his life in the often frustrating struggle to win justice for African-Americans, George Russell Trower-Subira embodied the meaning of the Swahili word that he added to his given name.

"Subira" means "patience" in Swahili. And that was one of the main characteristics of George's character.

"He had incredible patience with people," said his brother, Len Trower. "Even people who did unjust things to him, he would forgive them. He would try to rationalize why they did it. Me? I'd be throwing things against the wall."

 

George Russell Trower-Subira, who grew up in Philadelphia as George Trower and wrote numerous books of self-help advice for African-Americans as George Subira

He was a major influence on the subject of black entrepreneurship through his writings and speeches. His book, "Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America," published in 1980, was the first to tell blacks that what was missing from their drive for equality was success in the economic arena.

Always active in developing programs to benefit blacks, especially young people, George was working on a mentoring program for black youths and former prisoners when he died.

His aim was to stop what he saw as the revolving door of incarceration for African-American men.

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