Popular in History

  • The Real Rosewood Story with Lizzie Robinson Jenkins

    in History

    The Real Rosewood Foundation, Inc.
    The Real Rosewood Foundation was created in 2002 to develop a timeline, expand the search, find lost survivors, and locate descendants – black and white, inviting cultural participation to preserve an important history.
    Though it has been ninety-two years since the massacre, the descendants are still in touch with their beginning. Each year in July they celebrate family reunions. They are not angry and do not dwell on the past destruction of their hometown. Choosing to attain higher learning, many have gone on to become educators, doctors, lawyers, engineers, superintendent of schools, and skilled workers. They never lost the work ethics and values instilled in them by their ancestors. A most recent development regarding Rosewood is the interest of white Rosewood descendants in helping protect the history.
    This foundation is dedicated to building the Rosewood Black History Preservation and Research Center in memory of the Rosewood survivors and descendants at Mahulda's Archer, Florida homestead. Additionally, the foundation sponsors a scholarship in honor of Mahulda Gussie Brown Carrier, the third Rosewood schoolteacher employed in Levy County. Carrier is the first and only black female principal employed in Levy County and is believed the second black female principal hired in the state of Florida . The foundation is working to produce a documentary recapping real truths by historian Lizzie Jenkins, founder and president of The Real Rosewood Foundation, who is writing her life story which includes how she unlocked the secrets of Rosewood through consistent research. Moreover, the foundation is producing two songs, "Rosewood Florida" and "Rosewood, No More".

  • Topic of Discussion: The History Of U.S. Public Education

    in History

    Public education in the U.S. has a dynamic history. Join the national award-winning family radio talk show Let's Talk America with Host Shana Thornton as it spotlights the history of the public school system with leading historian Kimberly Springle. This segment will dissect the various periods of American history as it pertains to the education of youth. Tune in with every member of the family on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 7:30 pm EST. Real talk for real people!
     
    Please support our national sponsors by visiting www.letstalkamericawithshanathornton.com. Thank you. 

  • New York City during the Great Depression with Suzanne Wasserman

    in History

    Suzanne Wasserman, director of the Gotham Center for New York City History, joins Jane to talk about New York City during the Great Depression of the 1930s. How did the Great Depression affect your NYC ancestors? What has the 1940 U.S. Census told us about their lives?  Suzanne is an historian and award-winning filmaker. She has a Ph.D. in American history from New York University.
    Find the Gotham Center at www.GothamCenter.org.
    Depression Era photographs by Rebecca Lepkoff.

  • Using Civil Right's Records to Find the Story with Antoinette Harrell

    in History

    Using Civil Rights Records to Find The Story In Your Community and Family
    Please join genealogist and family historian Antoinette Harrell for a discussion of how and why researchers will want to explore the Civil Right's records to find relatives that were engaged in the Civil Right's movement throughout the South.  Ms. Harrell will use a case example of Mr. Herbert Lee a Civil Rights leader from Amite County, Mississippi to illustrate what was documented in Federal Records about him.
    The Department of Justice Records are available under the Civil Rights Division at the National Archives.
     
     

  • Records of Post-Civil War Federal Agencies at NARA - Reginald Washington

    in History

    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the official repository of the permanently valuable records of the U.S. Government.  NARA's vast holdings document the lives and experiences of persons who interacted with the Federal Government.  The records created by post-Civil War Federal Agencies are perhaps some of the most important records available for the study of black family life and genealogy.  This discussion will focus on NARA's Reference Information Paper 108.
    This reference information paper describes three post-Civil War Federal agencie's records: the Bureau of Refugee's, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands; the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company; and the Commissioner's of Claims. Case examples will be shared to illustrate the value of researching these important records.
    Reginald Washington is a retired archivist/ genealogy specialist with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). He lectures frequently on records and research procedures at the National Archives, and has served as the African-American Genealogy Subject Area Specialist at NARA. He has spoken at conferences of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Institute on Genealogical Research, and numerous local genealogical societies and clubs. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

  • Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams and the Adams Natl Historic Site

    in History

    This morning author Rosana Y. Wan joins Jane to talk about her book The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams and her experience working as a park ranger at the Adams National Historic Site in Quincy, Massachusetts. Rosana will discuss the traditional New England fare that the Adams ate while living in Massachusetts and the international influences that their travels brought to their food as they became revolutionaries, diplomats and the First Family of the U.S.
    Born in Hong Kong and raised in various places in the United States, Rosana Yin-Ting Wan attended University of Houston-Downtown in Houston and later graduated with honors from Suffolk University, Boston, with a degree in history. Since relocating to Boston, where she currently lives, she has pursued her passion for studies in the history of the American Revolution. 
    Find the book here: http://www.schifferbooks.com/the-culinary-lives-of-john-abigail-adams-a-cookbook-5538.html
    Adams National Historic Site: http://www.nps.gov/adam/index.htm

  • A Family Migration Story from South Carolina to Philadelphia with Rennard East

    in History

    Rennard East is a hip hop artist/ songwriter from Philadelphia, PA. One of his new passions is genealogy because he knew nothing about his ancestors when growing up. He heard family stories and now, he is trying to put this intricate puzzle together. He was recently featured on the PBS program "Genealogy Roadshow" which traced his family's story from Edgefield, South Carolina to Philadelphia his hometown. He had a great experience on the "Genealogy Roadshow" and cannot wait to share his new discoveries with everyone.
     
     
     

  • Why the New York Times is Wrong - Kenneth A. Bravo, JD

    in History

    “Why the New York Times is Wrong – Using Basic Genealogy Tools and Methods to Show that Your Family Name Was Not Changed At Ellis Island”.
    There is a common misconception, call it an old wives tale or an urban legend, that family names were often changed at Ellis Island.  Such myths gain a great deal of credibility when newspapers such as the New York Times, the country’s “paper of record”, perpetuates these myths by repeating them, in this case in obituaries.
    When Kenneth saw one of these obituaries a few years ago, he wrote to the Times pointing out their error and suggesting sources that they could check to verify what he was saying.  When they seemed to ignore him, he did the research on the family of the person named in the obituary and was able to show what the name was when the family immigrated and how the family name changed as they adapted to life in the United States.  He sent all of the proof to the Times and was still ignored.  Finally the Times responded.  They were not going to do anything to correct the erroneous obituary but suggested they might do a news story on the issue.  The experience led him to do a search of other Times obituaries with the Ellis Island story.  He located about half a dozen.  After doing the research on each, he was able to show the original name for each of them.
    Kenneth A. Bravo received his JD from The Ohio State University, College of Law and his B.A. degree in Economics from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.  He is Vice President of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) and, the former president and current member of the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland.  Bravo has lectured on a number of genealogical topics.

  • NGS St. Charles 2015 and the New York Track

    in History

    Jane welcomes the presenters of the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society-sponsored New York Track at the National Genealogical Society's 2015 conference in St. Charles, Missouri. The New York Track team will talk about the lineup of New York topics at this year’s conference. The track presenters include Karen Maurer Jones on New York Land: Patroonships, Manors, Patents, Rent Wars & Land and Records Created by New York's Towns and Cities: Uncommonly Rich Resources, Terry Koch-Bostic on City Directories: Antiquarian People Finders, and Jane on The New York Gateway: Immigration and Migration and New York City and State Vital Records and Their Substitutes. Terry will also give the NYG&B Luncheon talk on Intuition and Genealogy Success: A Sixth Sense, Chance, Coincidence, or Serendipity? The New York Track and Luncheon take place on 14 May.
    Terry will also talk about the conference as a whole.
    http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/

  • Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change - James H. Commander

    in History

    James H. Commander utilized genealogical research techniques to author his book, Love At Our Roots: How Freedom Became A Force For Change.
    His book has been accepted into the prestigious Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York, as well as, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in Atlanta, Georgia. His lecture focuses on using family research to uncover empowering heritage for future generations.
    Commander holds a Bachelor and Master's degree in arts, entertainment and media management from Columbia College of Chicago, Full Sail University.  He resides in Greenville, South Carolina with his family.
     
     

  • New York Municipal Archives with Ken Cobb

    in History

    Join Ken Cobb as he talks about one of the richest repositories in New York City: the New York Municipal Archives.

About History

As Carl Sagan said, "You have to know the past to understand the present." History has shaped our nation's character, and our collective strength is measured in how we came together during our most challenging moments: the Civil War, World War I, Prohibition, World War II, the Dust Bowl, McCarthyism, the Cold War, the Challenger disaster, Operation Desert Storm, 9/11 and countless struggles before and since. But history also contains triumphs, from ending slavery to the moon landing to the fall of the Berlin Wall to Mars rover Curiosity. Join in discussion on these and more with historians, collectors, authors, professors and conspiracy theorists alike. Our hosts also show much support for our troops and military families. In fact, technology has played a big part in bringing soldiers closer to home, as they text, email and Skype from the front, and our “talk to the troops” episodes are always inspiring.

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