Popular in History

  • Why "In God We Trust" Matters

    in History

    "In God We Trust" is our national motto. It's actually a law, signed into effect in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. How, then, is it suddenly so controversial? And why does a very vocal minority seem to wield such power? Lea Carawan, Executive Director of the Congressional Prayer Caucus Foundation, discusses the campaign to draw attention to this issue by placing "In God We Trust" decals on a million windows.
    lick here to chat with us during the LIVE show broadcast!
    Have you had your healthy dose of reality lately? There are always at least two sides to every story. Have you ever wondered how someone, who saw the same thing you did, walked away telling a vastly different story? Which version was correct? Which one was the REAL story? Actually, both are! It’s just a matter of perspective. Joe takes the issues… especially the controversial issues (politics, prejudice, religion, illegal immigration)… and brings in people from different sides to share their viewpoint. This is definitely not a fluff piece. And while no one is attacked, the questions are hard-hitting. But the conversation is always respectful and you’re sure to learn something new, even if you don’t agree! If you’ve always wondered how the “other side” thinks and how they’ve arrived at their “stand”, then this is the show for you! 
    It’s not the right side, it’s not the wrong side, but the REAL side of the issues!

  • Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations with Jean L. Cooper

    in History

     
    Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations with Jean L. Cooper
    Welcome, Jean L. Cooper, a Cataloger and Reference Librarian, and Genealogical Resources Specialist at the University of Virginia Library. 
    Ms. Cooper received the Virginia Genealogical Society’s Virginia Records Award in 2009 for her work in indexing the Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations microfilm collection. She has a B.A. from Alma College (Alma, MI), and an M.L. from the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC).
    Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations is a set of microfilms that contains images of manuscript materials from fourteen different libraries and archives across the South. 
    The entire set includes 1500 reels of microfilm, each with approximately 1000 frames resulting in 1.5 million manuscript images of material written primarily between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The items indexed include deeds, wills, estate papers, genealogies, personal and business correspondence, account books, slave lists, and many other types of records.
    Title: Index to Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations: Locations, Plantations, Surnames and Collections, 2d ed.
    Author: Jean L. Cooper
    Publisher: MacFarland, 2009
    ISBN: 978-0786439904

  • The Global Family Reunion with AJ Jacobs

    in History

    Join AJ Jacobs on today's show to find out about the Global Family Reunion, which will be held on 6 June 2015 at the New York Hall of Science, on the grounds of the World’s Fair. Journalist, lecturer, human guinea pig and author of four New York Times bestsellers, AJ is also host of the biggest, most inclusive and most fascinating family reunion in history. He will tell us what's in store for all attendees -- including talks by celebrities, scientists and comedians.
    The event will be featured in a documentary by Morgan Spurlock (Supersize Me).
    http://globalfamilyreunion.com/

  • Searching Records of Incarceration with Sharon Batiste Gillins

    in History

    Have you ever considered searching records of incarceration to find your ancestors?
    Join Sharon Batiste Gillins for an engaging discussion on the genealogical value of searching records of the incarcerated.
    Sharon Batiste Gillins is a native of Galveston, Texas with paternal ancestral roots in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana and maternal roots in Fort Bend County, Texas. A life-long interest in her family's history led to an active involvement in researching African American family history over the past 25 years. While researching her own family, she developed an in interest in unique and under-utilized record systems and record groups.  Some of her more recent work focuses on strategies researchers can use to analyze Louisiana’s Freedmen’s Bureau field office records for revealing, often personal information on freedmen ancestors.
    Ms. Gillins is a member of the Galveston Historical Society, National Genealogical Society, and Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society.  A retired Associate Professor at Riverside City College, she frequently calls upon her career background as a college educator to present workshops or deliver courses at regional and national conferences and genealogical institutes.   She is also a member of the adjunct faculty at Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research in Birmingham.  

  • The Nazi Connection to Islamic Terrorism

    in History

    Back with us: Author, columnist & nationally syndicated, veteran radio talk-show host Chuck Morse joins Debra on TRUTHTalk Beyond the Sound Bite to recount the remarkable story of Amin al-Husseini relative to ongoing genocide against Israeli Jews. Al-Husseini was a Palestinian Arab nationalist and Muslim leader in Mandatory Palestine. Discover how Germany’s Nazi past informs the present Middle East crisis. Also, explore al Husseini’s pivotal role, while on the Nazi payroll, in having urged European governments to transfer Jews to death camps—and his funneling Nazi loot into pro-war Arab countries. 

  • Forging Freedom: Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, Ph.D.

    in History

    Forging Freedom: Black Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston
    Amrita Chakrabarti Myers earned her doctorate in American History from Rutgers University. A historian of the black female experience, she is interested in race, gender, sexuality, rights, freedom, and citizenship and the ways in which these constructs intersect with one another in the lives of black women in the Old South. She is currently Associate Professor of History and Gender Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.
    For black women in antebellum Charleston, freedom was not a static legal category but a fragile and contingent experience. A deeply researched social history, Forging Freedom reveals the ways in which black women in Charleston acquired, defined, and defended their own vision of freedom. Drawing on legislative and judicial materials, probate data, tax lists, church records, family papers, and more, Myers creates detailed portraits of individual women while exploring how black female Charlestonians sought to create a fuller freedom by improving their financial, social, and legal standing. Examining both those who were officially manumitted and those who lived as free persons but lacked official documentation, Myers reveals that free black women filed lawsuits and petitions, acquired property (including slaves), entered into contracts, paid taxes, earned wages, attended schools, and formed familial alliances with wealthy and powerful men, black and white--all in an effort to solidify and expand their freedom. Never fully free, black women had to depend on their skills of negotiation in a society dedicated to upholding both slavery and patriarchy. Forging Freedom thus examines the many ways in which Charleston's black women crafted a freedom of their own design instead of accepting the limited existence imagined for them by white Southerners.

  • Records Preservation: Are We Losing Access to Records? with Jan Alpert

    in History

    Jan Alpert, the chair of the Records Preservation and Access Committe (RPAC), joins Jane this evening to talk about the organization and its mission to preserve open access to records around the country. Jan will discuss the Genealogists' Declaration of Rights, which was announced at the NGS Conference in Richmond, Virginia in May; what it means to genealogists as records are increasingly being closed to the public; and what we can do to help keep records available to us and maintain privacy as the same time. She'll tell us where the current hot spots around the country are.
     

  • New Netherland Institute with Charles Gehring

    in History

    Charles Gehring, director of the New Netherland Research Center at the New York State Library in Albany, joins Jane today to talk about the New Netherland Institute. 
     
    http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/

  • A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life - Allyson Hobbs

    in History

     
    Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor in the history department at Stanford.  She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and she received a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Chicago.  She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford.  Allyson teaches courses on American identity, African American history, African American women’s history, and twentieth century American history. She has won numerous teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize.  She has appeared on C-Span and National Public Radio and her work has been featured on cnn.com and slate.com.  Allyson’s first book, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present.
     

  • The New York Research Guide

    in History

    Today's show features The New York Research Guide from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.

About History

As Carl Sagan said, "You have to know the past to understand the present." History has shaped our nation's character, and our collective strength is measured in how we came together during our most challenging moments: the Civil War, World War I, Prohibition, World War II, the Dust Bowl, McCarthyism, the Cold War, the Challenger disaster, Operation Desert Storm, 9/11 and countless struggles before and since. But history also contains triumphs, from ending slavery to the moon landing to the fall of the Berlin Wall to Mars rover Curiosity. Join in discussion on these and more with historians, collectors, authors, professors and conspiracy theorists alike. Our hosts also show much support for our troops and military families. In fact, technology has played a big part in bringing soldiers closer to home, as they text, email and Skype from the front, and our “talk to the troops” episodes are always inspiring.

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