Popular in History

  • Missing Pages Of History

    in History

    Join "Missing Pages of History" on a bi-weekly basis on Saturdays 12 Noon, as we discuss "Hot Topics, Current Events & News You Can Use."  You can listen in at 818-337-0016 or go online at www.blogtalkradio.com/missing-pages-of-history-inc
     
     

  • Records Preservation: Are We Losing Access to Records? with Jan Alpert

    in History

    Jan Alpert, the chair of the Records Preservation and Access Committe (RPAC), joins Jane this evening to talk about the organization and its mission to preserve open access to records around the country. Jan will discuss the Genealogists' Declaration of Rights, which was announced at the NGS Conference in Richmond, Virginia in May; what it means to genealogists as records are increasingly being closed to the public; and what we can do to help keep records available to us and maintain privacy as the same time. She'll tell us where the current hot spots around the country are.
     

  • African and Native American Research with Angela Walton-Raji

    in History

    Genealogist Angela Walton-Raji has committed herself to sharing information with the descendants of the Freedmen of Indian Territory--which is now Oklahoma. She is the author of  the book Black Indian Genealogy Research: African American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes. The book serves as a guide to researching the history and lives of the 20,000 Freedmen of Indian Territory, who have been deleted from American history. She is also the author of the http://african-nativeamerican.blogspot.com.
    The Dawes Commission, named after Henry C. Dawes who chaired the commission, consisted of a process that would lead to a redistribution of land to those who already owned it among the Five "Civilized" Tribes. Understand that land was held in common by the Five Civilized Tribes. The Dawes Enrollment process was created to determine who would be eligible for allotted parcels of land. Eligibility involved providing "proof" that one had been a part of the tribe for several decades, and especially in those years immediately following the Civil War. So one had to prove that one had been a part of the Indian Community since 1866. For those whose ancestors were enslaved by members of the Tribes, (the Freedmen)  they had to often provide proof that their former enslaver was a member of the tribe.

  • January Jones - 9/11 Forever Changed

    in History

    January Jones sadly Remembering 911 
    On September 11, 2010, for the nine-year anniversary at Ground Zero, Melissa spoke the names of those who passed on 9-11.  She said her aunt’s name and a special message.  That was live coverage presented nationally and internationally.  
    One of the biggest losses Melissa has had to deal with was losing her aunt, Arlene T. Babakitis on September 11, 2001.  That day was a day no one will ever forget
    Fox News interviewed both, Melissa and her mother, Evelyn Pettignano, for their Fox News Documentary in regards to the 10 year anniversary of September 11, 2001 for Bill O'Reilly’s, What's Happening Now. 
    Melissa and her mother shot a documentary film in New York City, entitled, Forever Changed 911 in Remembrance, in regards to 9-11 for ACLJ- American Center for Law and Justice.  

  • Advocating for a Cultural Heritage Site with Margo Lee Williams

    in History

    Join Margo Lee Williams as she shares her research and journey to gain designation of the first African American site (Strieby Congregational United Church of Christ, where many in her family were founding members in 1880), by the Randolph County North Carolina Historical Preservation Commission for “Cultural Heritage Site” .
    Margo Lee Williams holds an MA in Sociology and an MA in Religious Education. She developed an interest in genealogy early in life and in the 30+ years since, she has researched and written extensively on her family, including her recently published book: Miles Lassiter (circa 1777-1850), an Early African American Quaker from Lassiter Mill, Randolph County, North Carolina: My Research Journey to Home, for which she won the 2012 Excellence in Publishing Award from the North Carolina Genealogical Society..
    Margo is a well-known lecturer for the Family History Centers of the LDS Church in the Washington, DC area, a former editor of the Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and through her private research company, Personal Prologue, has developed expertise in identifying heirs for intestate probates. She is currently a National Veterans’ Service Officer with Vietnam Veterans of America. 

  • New Netherland Institute with Charles Gehring

    in History

    Charles Gehring, director of the New Netherland Research Center at the New York State Library in Albany, joins Jane today to talk about the New Netherland Institute. What does the NNI do? How can we use the records it has preserved and translated from colonial Dutch New York? 
    http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/

  • A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life - Allyson Hobbs

    in History

     
    Allyson Hobbs is an assistant professor in the history department at Stanford.  She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and she received a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Chicago.  She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford.  Allyson teaches courses on American identity, African American history, African American women’s history, and twentieth century American history. She has won numerous teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize.  She has appeared on C-Span and National Public Radio and her work has been featured on cnn.com and slate.com.  Allyson’s first book, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present.
     

  • Back There, Then with Linda Crichlow White

    in History

    BACK THERE, THEN was written by Marietta Stevens Crichlow in the 1990s and discovered by her daugther Linda Crichlow White in 1999 when looking through Marietta's photos and family memorabilia to include in a Powerpoint presentation for her Mom's 90th birthday.
    Linda will share in her discovery and offer words of wisdom to others considering writing an historical genealogy memoir.
    Linda Crichlow White was born in Washington and attended public schools there before attending college (University of Cincinnati and West Virginia State College, B.S. and Howard University, M.S. in Human Ecology) and beginning a teaching career in Brooklyn, New York.  Linda taught home economics in both Brooklyn and DC Public Schools before attending Catholic University, earning a Masters in Library Science and working as a School Library Media Specialist in Montgomery County, Maryland.  She retired in 2013. 
    Both Marietta and Linda have witnessed many changes in the world and especially in Washington, DC.   Some of these changes are noted in Back There, Then.

  • English Manorial Records for 17th Century American Immigrants with Peter Foden

    in History

    Archivist, paleographer and historical researcher Peter Foden joins Jane from the United Kingdom today to talk about using English manorial records to track your colonial American family, whether they were in New England or Virginia, to their roots in England. Peter will discuss what types of records can be found in the manor records, how to use the records, what information can be found in the records, and the challenges in using these records from the 17th and 16th centuries -- including the penmanship and language. (Many of the records are in Latin!) 
    Peter has worked in local authority archive services in Shropshire and Staffordshire, in education, and in business (the Oxford University Press and Boots the Chemist). He is currently providing archive consultancy services to a stately home, amongst the other freelance activities listed on this website. He is a member of the Archives and Records Association (UK & Ireland).
    http://www.peterfoden.com/
    http://apps.nationalarchives.gov.uk/mdr/

  • The New York Research Guide

    in History

    Today's show features The New York Research Guide from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.

  • Mind Maps for Genealogy with Ron Arons

    in History

    Today author Ron Arons joins Jane to talk about his book Mind Maps for Genealogy.

About History

As Carl Sagan said, "You have to know the past to understand the present." History has shaped our nation's character, and our collective strength is measured in how we came together during our most challenging moments: the Civil War, World War I, Prohibition, World War II, the Dust Bowl, McCarthyism, the Cold War, the Challenger disaster, Operation Desert Storm, 9/11 and countless struggles before and since. But history also contains triumphs, from ending slavery to the moon landing to the fall of the Berlin Wall to Mars rover Curiosity. Join in discussion on these and more with historians, collectors, authors, professors and conspiracy theorists alike. Our hosts also show much support for our troops and military families. In fact, technology has played a big part in bringing soldiers closer to home, as they text, email and Skype from the front, and our “talk to the troops” episodes are always inspiring.

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