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"From Tragedy to Triumph" -- With Paralympian, Ryan Boyle

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Faces of TBI

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In 2003 Ryan Boyle was dragged by a truck causing him immediately to go into a coma. After emergency brain surgery, where they removed a portion of his brain, it seemed like all hope was gone. Proof that miracles do happen, not only did he wake from the coma, but soon started a rigorous battle to learn how to stand, walk, eat, and everything else, all over again.

Through patience, hard work and lots of love and support, not only did Ryan defeat the odds, but he thrived through the recovery process and paved his way to become the youngest member of the USA Paralympic Road Cycling Team, winning a silver medal in the Rio 2016 games.

Now, in between his Paralympic training schedule (he resides at the Olympic Training Village in Colorado), going to school and finishing his second book, Ryan is devoted to helping others by sharing his story and offering advice to those experiencing hardships.

He recently graduated from Blessed Trinity High School in Roswell. When Ryan wrote his book When The Lights Go Out: A Boy Given a Second Chance at the end of his freshmen year of high school, he knew that he wanted to speak about his road to recovery and share his story of inspiration. He has spoken at his school in Georgia, at Clemson University, and at Safe America, where he went for his driving classes.

"This inspirational story describes how I had to overcome enormous obstacles. It is also about a spiritual journey of reflection, prayer, and many incomprehensible acts of faith. This is a living example of how a horrific event can be overcome by measures of strength, determination, and faith that you never knew you had within." -- ryan

Find his book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2HAlxe8

Episode sponored by: Minnesota Functional Neurology 

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