The Significance of African American History

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On this Episode We will talk to Mr. Tambuzi about the significance  of African American History. Mr. Tambuzi is one fo the the people who influenced me to do more and be more.   

Mr. Tambuzi is a co-founder of the Affordable Housing Coalition of San Diego and served as its first treasurer. Additionally, he served as consultant to the Southeastern Economic Development Corp. (SEDC); working on employment and job readiness issues, and Christ Church of San Diego, Inc., as program coordinator for their Supplemental Educations Services Program, an outgrowth of No Child Left Behind legislation initiated by the Bush Administration.

Mr. Tambuzi is a civic and community advocate/activist with a focus on social and economic justice issues.  As such, he has been a member of the Organization Us, the founding organization of Kwanzaa and has been a practitioner of the holiday for as long.  He also serves on the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency Healthy Works Leadership Team and he is the co-facilitator of the County of San Diego Central Region Health Advisory Team.

Tambuzi helped organize many events, including the annual Cesar Chavez Walk in Lincoln Park, Kwanzaa celebrations, a farmer’s market and food co-op for seniors. Tambuzi is a graduate of LEAD San Diego and served as the president of African-American Writers and Artists, Inc. for two years.

Mr. Tambuzi attended San Diego City College, where his major focus of study was journalism, and the University of California, at San Diego, majoring in both Communications and Sociology. He has been married for the past twenty-eight years to Aminisha Tambuzi, co-founder and choreographer for the Teye Sa Thiosane African Drum and Dance Company.  Mr. Tambuzi is the father of six adult children and has nine grandchildren.

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