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Ross Greene PhD

Dr. Ross Greene

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Along with four school principals, Dr. Ross Greene -- originator of the Collaborative Problem Solving approach (now called Collaborative & Proactive Solutions) and author of The Explosive Child and Lost at School -- helps teachers and parents better handle behaviorally challenging kids in the classroom and at home through implementation of his approach to solving problems collaboratively. This program airs on the first Monday of each month (September through May) at 3:30 pm Eastern time.

Upcoming Broadcasts

On the first Monday of every month at 3:30 pm Eastern time, from September through May, Dr. Ross Greene and four principals from schools in the U.S. and Canada cover a wide range of topics related to behaviorally challenging students and school discipline in general and Dr. Greene's Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS) model in particular. You can call into the program to get your questions answered or submit them via email here. And, if you can't listen live, all the programs are archived in the Listening Library on the Lives in the Balance website or through i-Tunes.
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On-Demand Episodes

On today's program, our panel responded to an email from an anguished teacher who was looking for some guidance on what went wrong with one of her students and his parents.

As always, we covered lots of territory on today's program...including how CPS can help students who are in fight or flight mode and how to help kids who have very tough lives outside of school.

Goodness, there sure are a lot of ways to stray from the CPS model...and we heard about a lot of them on this program!

Those adult-imposed consequences that are so popular in schools these days...do we really need 'em? You can probably guess the answer...

What happens when parents and teachers skip concerns and jump straight to solutions? Probably nothing good.

On this final program of the school year, one of our principals told us about a student whose behavioral challenges have been making life very difficult...for himself and her. How best to get things on track?

Our principals weighed in on this question...and lots of others.

Schools abide by a least restrictive environment standard in placing kids in classroom settings...shouldn't schools also adhere to a least toxic response standard in helping students with behavioral challenges?

Are there students who are simply unmotivated to do well, or is it always more complicated than that? Is motivation the engine or the caboose? Alas, this was a very interesting discussion...
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