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We Have Not Come This Far By Faith!

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It was not until 1954 that the doctrine of "separate but equal" was challenged. In an attempt to gain equal educational opportunities for their children that were not provided for under the Plessy vs. Fergusen decision, African-American community leaders took action against segregation in America's schools. Aided by the local chapter of the NAACP, a group of 13 parents filed a class action suit against the Board of Education of Topeka Schools.
 
Organized resistance to integration
 
The change against segregated schools did not come without a fight. Southern activists and politicians resisted the move and did much to stop integration from invading their states. In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower was forced to send National Guard troops to the Little Rock, Arkansas, High School to protect the first entering black students. Numerous white parents reacted by moving their children to private schools.

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