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Black Panthers! Black Power! Black Retaliation! Black Rage!

  • Broadcast in Psychology
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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr (lawyer/middle class-blackman) was the first blackman to use the slogan black power. He used it at a bacculereate graduation address, Howard University May 29, 1966, and Stockley Carmichael (SNCC leader for Martin Luther King, Jr./middle class black ethics) was the first blackman to actualize it.
 
Black Power Movement 2011 has an estimated 20 thousand members on record and an additional five thousand deputies surveying communities nationwide. Black Power is a political slogan espoused by black racialists and a name for various associated ideologies.[1] It is used in the movement among people of Black African descent throughout the world, though primarily by African Americans in the United States.[2] The movement was prominent in the late 1960s and early 1970s, emphasizing racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests[3] and advance black values,[4] as opposed to multiculturalism.
"Black Power" expresses a range of political goals, from defense against racial oppression, to the establishment of separate social institutions and a self-sufficient economy (separatism). Not only did this "Black Power" movement encourage separatism, but it helped usher in black radical thoughts, and action against what was considered to be an elusive, yet visible higher power. The earliest known usage of the term is found in a 1954 book by Richard Wright titled Black Power.[5] New York politician Adam Clayton Powell Jr. used the term on May 29, 1966 during a baccalaureate address at Howard University: "To demand these God-given rights is to seek black power."[6]
 

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