The Sanuces Bloodline Brotherhood Part 9 interview with Professor Peter Lawson

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Professor Peter Lawson started his experiential journey in the world of martial arts at the age of 11 years old in Jamaica, West Indies. Under the tutelage of Sensei Errol Lyn, he studied Seido Karate after which he became 2nd Belt Karate Champion of Jamaica in 1982. Eventually, at the tender age of 15 years old, he returned to New York City to attend college. In N.Y.C., World Seido Karate founder Kaicho Tadashi Nakamura promoted Mr. Lawson to his first black belt on October 4, 1987 after a grueling 2 hour sparring session (the final installment of a 2 week test). Later, he earned a 2nd place at the World Seido Karate Invitational Tournament, Middle Weight Division – Black belt.

Next, Mr. Lawson intensely trained (6 days per week; up to 4 hours per day) with the late great Dr. Moses Powell in Sanucus Ryu Jiujitsu after a chance meeting in Brooklyn. First, he was invited to train at the good doctor’s residence before transferring to the infamous “When World Collide Dojo.” The rigorous training paid off when Mr. Lawson earned a 6th degree blackbelt in Sanucus Ryu Jiujitsu.

In February of 1997, Mr. Lawson began studying a new art – Brazilian Jiujitsu – which became popular with the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championships and Mixed Martial Arts competitions. Mr. Lawson’s study took him all over the world: Japan; Brazil; U.A.E., and throughout the U.S.A. with his illustrious instructor – Master Renzo Gracie and his family. Within his years of studying said art, Mr. Lawson won 3 Gold medals, 1 Silver medal and 1 Bronze medal at the Pan American Jiujitsu Championships. He, also, won a Bronze medal at the International Masters & Seniors Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

”We do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training.“

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