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POST ELECTION KILLER POLICE EDWARD KIRUI ACQUITTED

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Denzel Musumba

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Justice Minister Mutula Kilonzo has expressed outrage at the acquittal of an officer tried for the killings of two Kisumu demonstrators in 2008. The minister said he would keep a video clip showing the alleged shooting of the demonstrators protesting after the release of the 2007 presidential poll results. Mutula was addressing a civic education meeting on the Proposed Constitution yesterday, at the Mombasa Town Hall. "As a lawyer for the last 35 years, I am shocked that the trial has ended up in the acquittal of the police officer," Mutula said, urging Kenyans to vote for the Proposed Constitution. Kenyans watched video He claimed Kenyans watched the shooting when it was aired on television, adding the ruling saddened him. A mismatch by one digit in firearm serial numbers caused the court to give Kirui the benefit of doubt and get him off the hook. Addressing the gathering, Mutula said Kenyans wanted a new constitution "to ensure comprehensive reforms especially in the police force and the Judiciary". Justice, National Cohesion and Constitutional Affairs PS Amina Mohamed, Secretary Gichara Kibara and constitutional experts Zain Abubakar and Dr Smokin Wanjala accompanied the minister to the Mombasa civic education. Edward Kirui, the officer who has been tried since February 2008, escaped death over a disparity in prosecution evidence. His was the last of the four murder cases arising from post-election violence, none of which has been convicted. The family of William Onyango, who Kirui was accused of killing while he demonstrated unarmed, was outraged by the turn of events and, through spokesman John Olago, vowed to move to the Court of Appeal to challenge the judgement. Two judges, Erastus Mutungi and Fred Ochieng’, heard the case in which 22 witnesses were called.

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