Denise Bolds

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Stop Being NIGGARDLY & Nine Other Things Black People Need to Stop Doing!

  Broadcast in Culture

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This title grabs you! But it's NOT new, Nannie Helen Burroughs wrote this a 100 years ago and now - KAREN HUNTER has put this important document written by a successful black woman for her people a century ago is now still is very necessary &relative. THIS is the book for African Americans for the DECADE! Before you get all caught up in the "N" word, look it up and get ready for Karen Hunter to BE EMPOWERED!!! That’s the jumping-off point for this powerful directive from Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author Karen Hunter. It’s time for the black community to stop marching, quit complaining, roll up their collective sleeves, channel their anger constructively, and start fixing their own problems, she boldly asserts. And while her straight-talking, often politically incorrect narrative is electrifyingly fresh and utterly relevant to today’s hot-button issues surrounding race, Hunter harks back to the wisdom of a respected elder—Nannie Helen Burroughs, who was ahead of her time penning Twelve Things the Negro Must Do for Himself more than a century ago. Burroughs’s guidelines for successful living—from making education, employment, and home ownership one’s priorities to dressing appropriately to practicing faith in everyday life—teach empowerment through self-responsibility, disallowing excuses for one’s standing in life but rather galvanizing blacks to look to themselves for strength, motivation, support, and encouragement. Karen Hunter is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, a celebrated radio talk-show host, and co-author of numerous New York Times bestsellers, including Confessions of a Video Vixen, On the Down Low, and Wendy's Got the Heat. She is also an assistant professor in the Film & Media Department at Hunter College!
Tags:
African American
Society
Relationships
History
Empowerment
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