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The Christian Funeral, Part 3 (Preparing for the Inevitable #43)

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Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

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This podcast will help you get ready to face the inevitable unpleasant things that will happen in your life -- things like trouble, suffering, sickness, and death -- the death of people you love and your own death. 

The Bible says in Revelation 9:6: “And in those days shall men seek death, and shall not find it; and shall desire to die, and death shall flee from them.”
 
The featured quote for this episode is an old Celtic teaching paraphrased by John O’Donohue. He said, “We do not need to grieve for the dead. Why should we grieve for them? They are now in a place where there is no more shadow, darkness, loneliness, isolation, or pain. They are home.”
 
Our topic for today is titled "The Christian Funeral, Part 3" from the book, "The Art of Dying: Living Fully into the Life to Come" by Rob Moll.

--- The Traditional Christian Funeral and Mourning Rituals (Continued)

Christians have always incorporated local cultures and particular practices into funerals, but “there is nevertheless a unifying force in the practice of Christian funerals,” writes Emory University professor and preacher Thomas Long: “the gospel narrative.” If we are to recover the funeral to its place of significance in the life of the church, we must start here. For in baptism, we were buried in Jesus’ Death, and we arose in His Resurrection. As Paul says in Romans 6:3-5: "Don’t you know that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death. . . . If we have been united with him like this in his death, we will certainly also be united with him in his resurrection."

The Christian funeral is a worship service that dramatically recognizes "that the Christian life is shaped in the pattern of Christ’s own life and death."

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