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The Date of the Exodus, Part 3 (The Covenant & the Cross #71)

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Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

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Exodus 15:1-4 which reads: "Then sang Moses and the children of Israel this song unto the Lord, and spake, saying, I will sing unto the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously: the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea. The Lord is my strength and song, and he is become my salvation: he is my God, and I will prepare him an habitation; my father's God, and I will exalt him. The Lord is a man of war: the Lord is his name. Pharaoh's chariots and his host hath he cast into the sea: his chosen captains also are drowned in the Red sea."

Today's quote about the Bible is from Jacquelyn K. Heasley. She said: "The Word of God is a Person. When you read it, do you see words or do you see Him?"

Our topic for today is titled "The Date of the Exodus (Part 3)" from the book, "The Promise and the Blessing" by Dr. Michael A. Harbin. 

Today, we are going to look at the third and fourth studies regarding the issue of the date of the Exodus.

STUDY 3: THE HEBREW CALENDAR 

Two factors affect the dating of Old Testament events. Israel, which used a different calendar than we do, had both a religious new year in the spring (marked by the Passover) and a civil new year in the fall (marked by Rosh Hashanah). In addition, the way the kings counted the time between their coronation and the next new year varied. Sometimes the coronation counted as the first year; at other times, the first full year counted as the first year. 

Putting these three items together and working through the biblical chronologies, we have a solid chain back to the division of the nation of Israel into the northern and southern kingdoms in 931 BCE. This means that Solomon took the throne in 971 BCE...

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