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Addendum on Religion and Morality in The Argument from Conscience for... (Pt 3)

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Daniel Whyte III

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Addendum on Religion and Morality in The Argument from Conscience for the Existence of God, Part 3

The Reasons to Believe #68

Our Reasons to Believe passage from the Word of God today is John 14:26. It reads, "But the Comforter, [which is] the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you." 

Our Reasons to Believe quote for today is from Abraham Lincoln. He said, "I can see how it might be possible for a man to look down upon earth and be an atheist, but I cannot conceive how he could look up into the heavens and say that there is no God."

Our Reason to Believe powerpoint today is titled "Addendum on Religion and Morality in The Argument from Conscience for the Existence of God" part 3 from "The Handbook of Christian Apologetics" by Peter Kreeft and Ronald K. Tacelli:

In the last broadcast, we discussed the four possible relations between religion and morality, God and goodness. Now, we will discuss the only other possible sources of moral obligation:

a. My ideals, purposes, aspirations, and desires, something created by my mind or will, like the rules of baseball. This utterly fails to account for why it is wrong to disobey or change the rules.

b. My moral will itseld. Some read Kant this way: I impose morality on myself. But how can the one bound and the one who binds be the same? If the locksmith locks himself in a room, he is not really locked in, for he can also unlock himself.

c. Another human being may be thought to be the one who imposes morality on me --- my parents, for example. But this fails to account for its binding character. If your father commands you to deal drugs, your moral obligation is to disobey him. No human being can have absolute authority over another. 

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