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GLMX #215: How Louis Zamperini Found his Greatest Peace and Satisfaction

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Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

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One of America's greatest heroes is a man named Louis Zamperini. He was an Olympic distance runner, a World War II prisoner of war survivor, and an inspirational speaker. He died this past year on July 2nd at the age of 97. His life story has been told in a new film titled Unbroken, which was directed by Angelina Jolie and is set to be released in December 2014.
 
While the movie focuses on Louis' life as an Olympic track star, a soldier, and a prisoner of war, it does not focus on a very important part of Louis' life -- how he came to believe in Jesus Christ as his Savior and how he found peace and satisfaction in his life. Back in 2003, Louis told his story on CBN. 

As the son of Italian immigrants, he said he was constantly teased in school, and his "whole life became a life of getting even." He was quite a trouble-maker as a young man -- stealing beer, cheating in school, and constantly getting into fights. One day, his brother, who was the chief of police, and his school's principal got together and convinced Louis to take up track, and that is how he became a world famous distance runner.

In 1941, Louis enlisted in the U.S. Army and was shortly thereafter sent to the Pacific theater during World War II. During a search-and-rescue mission, Louis and his fellow crew members crashed into the ocean. After 27 days on a lifeboat at sea, they were attacked by a Japanese plane. Miraculously, none of the three men was hit by a single bullet. On day 47, the three survivors landed on the Marshall Islands and were captured by Japanese forces. Louis was moved around to several prisoner-of-war camps until the end of the war when he came home to a hero's welcome.

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