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GLMX #91: The Sinking of the Unsinkable Titanic

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Daniel Whyte III

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Today, people all around the world are commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. From visiting the ship's birthplace in Belfast to hosting public exhibitions to walking through the Titanic Memorial Garden, many people all around the world are finding a way to remember what happened on that tragic day 100 years ago. 
 
The Titanic was on its maiden voyage in April of 1912. The biggest, most luxurious ship you could ever imagine was built and it was ready to grace the ocean. Not only was it luxurious, but it was by far one of the largest vessels ever made. Every safety feature known at that time was on the Titanic. It was a fast vessel and to many people, it was considered to be unsinkable. In fact, one of the ship's designers said "Not even God could sink the Titanic." On a quiet, peaceful April morning in 1912, the luxurious ship set out from Liverpool, England headed to New York Harbor. It carried 2,223 people including some of the wealthiest people in the world. Passengers from all around the world were on board the Titanic for its maiden voyage. They enjoyed good food, fine entertainment, and many other pleasures that the ship offered. However, nearly halfway through its maiden voyage, the ship hit an iceberg and immediately started to sink. As the crew raced to get people into lifeboats, they were only able to get 710 people off the ship. Within two and a half hours, the entire ship was under water, everybody else on board drowned. This day started out like any other day, but when the Titanic sank, it resulted in the deaths of 1,514 people. This sinking of the Titanic is considered one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history. 

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