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Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Midlife ADHD Women with guest Linda Roggli

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Durham, NC – Midlife women who develop a sudden case of “brain fog” run to their doctors, fearing early onset dementia or worse. Many are stunned at the diagnosis: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a lifelong condition that is often unmasked when women are on the cusp of menopause, according to Linda Roggli, PCC, an award-winning author, coach and retreat facilitator for ADHD women “40-and-better.”

“Most people think of ADHD as a children’s issue,” said Roggli, who discovered her own ADHD at age 47, “but there are literally millions of adults with ADHD, most of them unaware that their lifelong struggles have a name … and treatment. That’s why I created the ADDiva Network for ADHD women at midlife and beyond. We all need support, community and hope. Today, there are thousands of women across the globe who call themselves ADDivas!”

Though she wears her whimsical trademark ADDiva hat and takes an upbeat approach to adult ADHD, Roggli acknowledges the seriousness of this neurodevelopmental condition. ADHD adults often have trouble with time management, are disorganized with papers and bills, are usually underemployed, endure troubled relationships and have a profound sense of failure. Studies show that women with ADHD may have even more difficulty coping with ADHD than men because of their many roles that require multi-tasking.

“The ADDiva Network encourages women to come out of their dark (and messy) ADHD closets without judgment or shame,” said Roggli. “Through coaching, ADDiva retreats, online forums, webinars and support groups, we rebuild lives. When ADHD women realize that they are more than their ADHD and finally wake up to their full potential, the world shifts. My slogan for ADHD women is: Why are you trying to fit in when you were born to stand out?”

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