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Interview with Management Consultant Duane Cashin

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Blake Landau

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Duane Cashin is shouting from the roof tops that we do not live in a competitive marketplace but a crowded marketplace. Cashin, a sales trainer and management consultant, does not currently see companies performing at the level necessary to be successful in today’s marketplace. Cashin demands that sales executives re-evaluate the definition of a high performing organization. Cashin believes that the term “competitive” says a person, or organization, is pushing themselves to the limit. He does not see companies putting the investment into the training, coaching and development necessary to create a high performing competitive sales environment. Something you might see in the competitive sales environment includes sales reps working late into the evening doing the research necessary to really understand the prospect they are going to call on. Customer service organizations have veered away from spending the time it takes to gain a crystal clear and deep vision into what their customers want and need. In a competitive scenario once an organization understands their customer they then take what ever time is needed to ensure their team has the ability to ask excellent questions, really listen and link to what the customer wants and needs. Most call centers claim they are committed to doing what it takes to be “competitive,” but eventually lose focus and settle into what Cashin calls a “reactive world.” As a result they lose their competitive edge. They substitute pushing “themselves” to grow and understand, with pushing “product” or pushing their “agenda.” In doing so the call center, inbound or outbound, loses its competitive edge. Is your sales team coasting? What is the energy like on your sales floor?

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