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Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Alzheimer's Warrior Nita Scoggan

  Broadcast in Health

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Bedford, IN – More than five million Americans currently suffer from Alzheimer’s. According to the latest reports from the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Though research into the disease continues to make great strides, there remains no cure. We can only watch as our friends and loves ones progressively fade away.

But not Nita Scoggan. Nita is the “Alzheimer’s Warrior,” a health and happiness coach and fervent advocate of alternative treatments for this dreaded disease.

“Alzheimer’s has become an epidemic in America, so I do this to give people hope,” says Nita. “They can recover. Don’t just stick them in a nursing home with no dignity and no hope.”

Nita’s husband Bill was first diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 1999. Unwilling to accept his grim diagnosis, Nita resolved to see her husband restored.

A former Pentagon analyst, Nita’s research led to medical records from Germany and Italy by doctors that had worked in asylums. It was through these medical records that she first discovered phosphatidylserine.

“These doctors administered phosphatidylserine to wake their patients’ brains up,” says Nita. “Soon they began to talk. They began to recognize their relatives. I thought, ‘I’ve got to find this for Bill.’”

Phosphatidylserine is what controls your brain. When you’re young your brain is as sharp as can be. As you get older, however, your body gradually produces less and less phosphatidylserine. Nita claims her husband improved from the very first capsule. Within six months he was back to normal.

“It’s just been so wonderful to have my husband back,” says Nita. “I encourage people to remember that God is still in the miracle business. Don’t give up hope.”

Tags:
Alzheimer's
Dementia
phosphatidylserine
Alzheimer’s Association
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