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Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews

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Middlefield, CT – You can’t help your mind if your body is suffering. If you’re not eating right, sleeping right and exercising, you’re not able to heal, body or mind.

As a former member of research faculty focused in Mind-Body Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Alison Caldwell-Andrews studied the depths of the mind-body connection. Today, Dr. Caldwell-Andrews is a licensed clinical psychologist, dialectical behavioral therapist and an expert in mind-body health.

“It’s crucial to improve how you eat, sleep and exercise because the literature shows how deeply those things are connected to your mental health,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “The reason I include these things in therapy is because there is data that indicates this is appropriate and it works.”

Dr. Caldwell-Andrews specializes in what she describes as “sensitive people,” people who experience difficulty handling their emotions. Dr. Caldwell-Andrews employs a holistic approach to therapy to help her patients understand that their sensitivity can be a tremendous asset, not a source of pain in their life.

“We love insight, but the problem is insight alone doesn’t bring about change,” explains Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “When you change your behavior, you find that your feelings follow change too. Working on creating behavior change is key to what I do.”

According to Dr. Caldwell-Andrews, creating change is more than a mental process. Change requires nourishing and disciplining the brain, as well as behavioral practice.

“When I see people change and make gains, it makes me so happy,” says Dr. Caldwell-Andrews. “I love working with people and watching them change and grapple with problems and really get in a dirty fight with it. You don’t have to run away from it. We can do it together.”

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