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Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights Brian Kypta

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Folsom, CA – While the secret to a happy marriage remains a secret, many couples who have experienced difficulties in their relationship have found help through couples therapy. Unfortunately, according to recent surveys, nearly two-thirds of divorced couples never sought therapy before dissolving their relationship. Had they done so, perhaps many of these couples could have reconciled.

Brian Kypta is a registered Intern (IMF 68710) and employee of Life Practice Counseling Group (supervised by Carisa Sherwood LMFT 48768) specializing in couples therapy. Kypta works with couples in various levels of distress to help resolve their issues and restore their relationship.

“My client is not the husband or the wife,” says Kypta. “My client is the relationship. I don’t take sides. I look at how people relate to each other and I help them understand each other better to help resolve their issues.”

According to Kypta, couples typically don’t argue about the real issues bothering them. They argue around the issue because they don’t feel like it’s something they can bring up with their spouse.

“It’s not about mediation,” explains Kypta. “Couples often want to know out who is right about an issue, but that has nothing to do with my role. In almost every case, the real problem is that they have difficulties trusting one another. In therapy, couples learn how to develop that trust and how to nurture it over time."

The most important thing that is established in a therapeutic environment, says Kypta, is safety. It’s essential people feel safe, respected and heard. Ultimately, healing isn’t accomplished in the therapist’s office, but rather with each other.

“People only come to therapy because it’s important,” says Kypta. “What’s important is solving their problems."

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