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The Celebrity Link- Celebrating the works of REGGAE Iconic Group The Melodians

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 Trevor McNaughton had the idea of putting a group together and contacted the then fourteen year old Lloyd Brevett, who had already had success in local talent shows.[1] Brevett recruited his friend Brent Dowe and the group was formed, with Brevett taking on lead vocal duties.[1] Bramwell Brown and Ranford Cogle also had short stints in the group in its early days, and Cogle became one of the group's main songwriters.[1]

The group recorded some material with Prince Buster before Ken Boothe introduced them to Coxsone Dodd's Studio One label where in 1966 they recorded "Lay It On" (one of the first records to reflect the shift from ska to rocksteady), "Meet Me", "I Should Have Made It Up" and "Let's Join Hands (Together)".[1] Lead vocal duties were now shared between Brevett and Dowe.[1] From 1967 to 1968 they had a number of hits on Duke Reid's Treasure Isle label, including "You Have Caught Me", "Expo 67", "I'll Get Along Without You", and "You Don't Need Me".[1] After recording "Swing and Dine" for record producer Sonia Pottinger, they had further hits with "Little Nut Tree" before recording their biggest hit, "Rivers of Babylon" for Leslie Kong.[1] This song became an anthem of the Rastafarian movement, and was featured on the soundtrack for the movie, The Harder They Come.[2] In the early 1970s Brevett also recorded as a solo artist, having his greatest success with "Don't Get Weary".[1] After Kong's death in 1971, they recorded for Lee Perry and Byron Lee's Dynamic Studios. In 1973, Brent Dowe left the group for a solo career. The group reformed briefly a few years later, and again in the early 1980s.

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