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BerniceBennett

Research at the National Archives&Beyond

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Welcome to Research at the National Archives and Beyond! This show will provide individuals interested in genealogy and history an opportunity to listen, learn and take action. You can join me every Thursday at 9 pm Eastern, 8 pm Central, 7pm Mountain and 6 pm Pacific where I will have a wonderful line up of experts who will share resources, stories and answer your burning genealogy questions. All of my guests share a deep passion and knowledge of genealogy and history. My goal is to reach individuals who are thinking about tracing their family roots; beginners who have already started and others who believe that continuous learning is the key to finding answers. "Remember, your ancestors left footprints".

Upcoming Broadcasts

Alondra Nelson is Dean of Social Science and professor of sociology and gender studies at Columbia University. She is author of the award-winning book Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination and editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History. Her reviews, writing and commentary have also appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Science, Boston Globe, and the Guardian. She lives in New York City. The Social Life of DNA, Alondra Nelson takes us on an unprecedented journey into how the double helix has wound its way into the heart of the most urgent contemporary social issues around race. These cutting-edge DNA-based techniques, she reveals, are being used in myriad ways, including grappling with the unfinished business of slavery: to foster reconciliation, to establish ties with African ancestral homelands, to rethink and sometimes alter citizenship, and to make legal claims for slavery reparations specifically based on ancestry. Weaving together keenly observed interactions with root-seekers alongside illuminating historical details and revealing personal narrative, The Social Life of DNA shows that genetic genealogy is a new tool for addressing old and enduring issues.
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On-Demand Episodes

Join my special guest Wendy Jyang from Frienship Improvement Sharing Hands Development and Commerce.

The Civil War Pension Files of Philip McQuerter of Woodville, Wilkinson County, Mississippi provides revealing information about the family. Alvin Blakes is a lifelong organizer and community worker who has been researching African... more

This show will examine various case examples of when "wills" don't go as planned such as protests to wills, residual estates and guardianships. In addition, this show will review the records of probate for a typical slave-holding estate.... more

Marcellaus A. Joiner: Supervisor of the Heritage Research Center at the High Point Public Library and the Archivist for the High Point Museum in High Point, North Carolina. Marcellaus has a B.A.in History from North Carolina A&T State... more

History has always been a favorite subject for Erwin, and his genealogy research made it possible for him to be interviewed live by Bryant Gumble on the Friday July 3, 1993 ?Today Show.? He has been featured in the Wilmington News... more

The Todd's telling our Story from Virginia to Kentucky. Underwood vs Underwood's Executor, 1830, Federal Records, United States Circuit Court Records, 5th Circuit Court, obtained from the Library of Virginia's Manuscripts... more

Have you had your DNA tested and don't know what to do or say to your newly discovered relatives? Corresponding and conversing with unknown relatives found via DNA testing can present family members and genealogists with as many... more

Public historian David E. Paterson studies people who lived in nineteenth-century Upson County, Georgia, especially those who experienced slavery and Reconstruction. A civilian employee of the US Navy by day, he spends his... more

Forging Freedom: Black Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston For black women in antebellum Charleston, freedom was not a static legal category but a fragile and contingent experience. A deeply... more

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