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Based on Joseph Campbell - Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine by Safron

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Your Spiritual Awakening Zone

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While Joseph Campbell “covered the mythological waterfront,” he never wrote a book on the Goddess. However, he had much to say on the subject. Between 1972 and 1986 he gave over twenty lectures and workshops on Goddesses, exploring the figures, functions, symbols, and themes of the feminine divine, following them through their transformations.

These lectures, which are the basis for the new book Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine, have been in Campbell’s archival collection since his death in 1987. The material has never been heard or read by anyone other than those who originally attended the lectures. So Goddesses offers completely new, previously unpublished material for new and long-time Campbell fans alike. It is also the only book in Campbell’s collected works that focuses on his ideas and study of goddess mythologies through time and culture.

Edited by today's guest Safron Rossi, PhD, executive director of the Opus Archives and Research Center where Campbell’s archives are housed, Goddesses documents how Campbell’s work from the 1960s to the 1980s showed how the symbolic systems of the older goddess traditions survived in various forms, despite 2,000 years of patriarchal and monotheistic repression in mythologies and religion. “I believe this was one of the ways Campbell was addressing the importance of women finding and articulating what these ancient myths mean for women today, but from women's own perspectives and voices,” says Rossi. “The book also shows that Campbell was not solely focused on the male hero or experience of myth, but also studied and reflected on the feminine divine and goddess traditions.”

http://www.jcf.org. 

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