Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

Music journalist, author Lee Zimmerman on AMERICANA MUSIC on Authors on the Air

  • Broadcast in Books
Authors On The Air Radio

Authors On The Air Radio

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow Authors On The Air Radio.
h:292263
s:11305333
archived

Authors on the Air host Pam Stack welcomes Lee ZImmerman to the show.  Lee is a freelance music writer whose articles have appeared in several leaning music industry journals.  He is a former promotions rep for ABC and Capital Records and was communications director for various CBS-affiliated television stations.

Americana Music: Voices, Visionaries, and Pioneers of an Honest Sound   With roots in Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans, the Piedmont, Memphis, and the prairies of Texas and the American West, the musical genre called Americana can prove difficult to define. Nevertheless, this burgeoning trend in American popular music continues to expand and develop, winning new audiences and engendering fresh, innovative artists at an exponential rate.

 In its strictest sense, it is a blanket term for bluegrass, country, mountain music, rockabilly, and the blues. By a broader definition, it can encompass roots rock, country rock, singer/songwriters, R&B, and their various combinations. Bob Dylan, Hank Williams, Carl Perkins, and Tom Petty can all lay valid claims as purveyors of Americana, but so can Elvis Costello, Solomon Burke, and Jason Isbell. Americana is new and old, classic and contemporary, trendy and traditional.

Mining the firsthand insights of those whose stories help shape the sound—people such as Ralph Stanley, John McEuen (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), Chris Hillman (Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers), Paul Cotton and Rusty Young (Poco), Shawn Colvin, Kinky Friedman, David Bromberg, the Avett Brothers, Amanda Shires, Ruthie Foster, and many more—Americana Music provides a history of how Americana originated, how it reached a broader audience in the ’60s and ’70s with the merging of rock and country, and how it evolved its overwhelmingly populist appeal as it entered the new millennium,

Comments