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Adapting the Interpersonal: Reducing Gun Violence in Black Communities

  • Broadcast in Culture
At the Edge An Afrofuturist Salon

At the Edge An Afrofuturist Salon

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How many leaders who shape policy in American institutions believe in the racist myth that African-Americans accept gun violence in our communities as a norm?  Dehumanizing African-Americans in the justice system and in mainstream media has kept victims from receiving needed treatment and remedies in medical settings such as emergency rooms, as well as receiving needed counseling.  Racial bias may have also blinded us to possible preventative solutions beyond criminalization.  Epidemiologist Lisa Rose-Rodriguez discusses her work to decrease mortality rates for African American men and boys through counseling and improvement of interpersonal connections.  As a board member of Connecticut's Mothers United Against Violence, Lisa has worked with victims, and has advocated for a reinterpretation of gun violence as a public health issue that must be remedied by preventative counseling and treatment through local/state institutions, as well as nonprofit and grassroot organizations.

Lisa Rose-Rodriguez was born in Cleveland, Ohio. After graduating from Shaker Heights High School, she matriculated at Howard University in Washington, DC. There she upheld the tradition of attending an HBCU for three generations. She received a Masters of Public Health at the University of Connecticut and is completing a Ph.D. in Media Philosophy at the European Graduate School.

See "Chicago’s New Prohibition Era: Bottling Homicides," and "Reducing Gun Violence Morbidity and Mortality in African-American Males by Applying Interpersonal Communication Skills."

 

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