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Samuel Archer

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April Sims

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Join hosts April Sims and Poetry Man as they shine a positive light on Samuel E. Archer.

At the tender age of 4, Samuel was introduced to the piano. Given to him by his Tobago born father Sampson Archer. His father wanted him to study medicine and learn music for occasional playing but that was a lost dream. Samuel started playing for school assemblies and church functions by age 8, wrote his first song by age 9. He took music seriously and by age 16 he was playing for local hotels entertaining tourists, joined and performed with local bands, accompanying artists and he started a group called Hi-Lite. All members of his group including Samuel were students attending Harmon's High School in Tobago.


In 1988 he relocated to Brooklyn NY where he was introduced to Mr. Allen Chase, a known producer, music arranger and organist. Mr. Chase would become Sam's recording and producing mentor. Samuel also attended New York City Technical College(NYCTC) and while being there met fellow musicians in a newly formed club known as the music club, and by 1990 he became the president of the music Club.


There was a recording studio around the corner from City Tech(short name for NYCTC) where the music club would record practice sessions and there Samuel met Alexander Richbourg which started a twist in his musical direction. Alexander Richbourge was also a member of a production team called Track Masterz, which was later named Track Masters. Although Samuel was not a member of Track Masters, he worked closely with them on many tracks where his skill for playing keyboards was needed. Some of these countless collaborations worthy of mentioning were released such as Horace Brown's "Taste Your Love" track masters remix (Uptown/MCA) 1995,112 "Call My Name,"(Bad Boy) (1996).

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