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Documentary Filmmakers Josh Zeman, Rachel Mills of Chiller's KILLER LEGENDS

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On Sunday, 3/16 at 8pE, CHILLER debuts its new 2-hour special, KILLER LEGENDS. The horror documentary follows filmmakers Josh Zeman and Rachel Mills as they investigate the true crimes behind these urban legends while exploring how the myths evolved and why we continue to believe.

The documentary probes the following legends of:

The Candyman: Though the legend is prolific, in actuality there is only one documented case of a child dying from tainted candy: 8-year-old Timothy O’Bryan, who was poisoned on Halloween by a real-life miscreant who used the legend to hide his crime, earning him the fateful nickname.

The Baby-Sitter and the Man Upstairs: While the babysitter has become the go-to victim in so many horror films, does the same hold true in real life? Tragically, yes, as the filmmakers discover in unsolved case of Janett Christman, a babysitter slain in Columbia, MO, in 1950.

The Hookman: Based upon the legend of two teens lovers terrorized by a madman with a hook for a hand, filmmakers investigate the case of a killer known as The Phantom, who in 1946 attacked five couples parked on lovers’ lanes in Texarkana.

The Killer Clown: The filmmakers investigate “phantom clown” scares that have spontaneously occurred since the 1980s. As the duo explores Chicago’s creepy clown past, from John Wayne Gacy to Bozo, they attempt to answer the question of how clowns became so evil, and why they continue to haunt our nightmares.

Joshua Zeman has been creating independent films for over 10 years. His critically-acclaimed horror documentary CROPSEY, was critic’s pick with The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Roger Ebert, and was “one of the scariest films of the year” in 2010.

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