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Voting in America - Who is Counting? Mitchell speaks w Brent Turner & Brian Fox

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Today, Mitchell holds a Round Table discussion to look at voting systems in the U.S.  How good and accurate are they?  Are there better approaches to reduce fraud or inaccuracies?  Accurate voting is a pillar of Democracy.  Today's show will look at what the White House has known through one of our guests, voting expert Brent Turner,  and what has been ignored by the upper echelons of our government and leaders. 

Brent Turner is a graduate of Lincoln Law School in San Francisco and has a degree granted by University of San Diego in international legal studies from Oxford, England. Mr. Turner is a community activist whose efforts have included volunteer work for the homeless, children’s health and education, civil rights and environmental issues.

Mr. Turner was instrumental in the creation of the San Francisco County Voting Systems Task Force & has been a director of communications for Open Voting Consortium. Brent has been recognized as a ground breaking activist for sustainability & dedicates himself to local, state and federal issues.

Brian J Fox is an American computer programmer, entrepreneur, consultant, author, and free software advocate. He was the original author of the GNU Bash shell, which he announced as a beta in June 1989. He continued as the primary maintainer for bash until early 1993.

In 1985 Fox worked with Richard Stallman at Stallman's newly created Free Software Foundation. At the FSF, Fox authored GNU Bash, GNU Makeinfo, GNU Info, GNU Finger, and the readline and history libraries. He was also the maintainer of Emacs for a time, and made many contributions to the software that was created for the GNU Project between 1986 & 1994.

 

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