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Author Susan Kuchinskas with The Chemistry of Connection

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About the Book: When we make love, when we’re stroked, when we spend time with close friends, and even when we pet an animal, our brains respond by releasing pulses of oxytocin. This chemical, produced by the hypothalamus, floods the brain and body with feelings of connection, trust, and contentment. Researchers believe that this natural, powerful "love drug" plays an important role in all human social relationships. The Chemistry of Connection offers new information about how brain chemistry affects our platonic and intimate relationships and explains how oxytocin research can help us understand the psychological differences between men and women. But the book goes beyond detailing the biochemistry of love. It offers practical tips and guidance to help readers increase their natural supply of oxytocin in order to develop deep connections with family, friends, and romantic partners. About Chemistry of Connection: You may have heard of oxytocin, known as the "cuddle hormone." It's responsible for letting us feel life's most wonderful emotions. When we make love, when we’re stroked, even when we spend time with close friends, oxytocin floods our bodies with feelings of love, trust and contentment. This naturally secreted brain chemical is also the secret to forming committed relationships, turning lust into long-lasting love. But this love chemistry can go awry. When it does, we may bounce from one disastrous relationship to another, falling madly in love with wrong person after wrong person, while caring suitors leave us cold. The good news is, we can revitalize the body's powerful urge to bond when it's safe and right. I want to tell your listeners how to maximize their supply of this feel-good chemical in everyday life and how they can work to fundamentally change their emotional chemistry so that loving and trusting become as natural as breathing. About the Author: Susan Kuchinskas is a journalist with more than fifteen years of experience wh

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